Well, okay, the Hebrew on this user image actually says "Shakespeare." Everything else here, not so much.

 

Anonymous asked
Hello, I work for the George Santayana Critical Edition at IUPUI. We've been working to correct a common misattribution to Santayana, "The Earth has Music for those who listen." Recently, someone was able to successfully attribute the quote to Reginald Holmes, see our FAQ section for details (it won't allow me to add the link) We were wondering if it would be possible to have you post an update to your previous posting about it? Thank you.

THIS IS AWESOME. yeah, we’re just a bunch of shakespeare ‘scholars’ bloggers who know his work too well so we focus on misquotes of his. we’ve actually gotten more than a few asks about the correct attribution of that quote because i think it’s becoming more commonly known that it isn’t george santayana, but none of us had the time or energy to do the necessary digging. so yeah, of course, considering this is a blog focusing on misattributions, from this point forward we’ll source that quote with the correct info and we’ll attempt to correct our previously-made posts. really really thrilled to get this message. i’ll look up your faq so we can link to it if need be as well.

all the best!
-that’s not shakespeare

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in us.

a quote from Shakespeare that needed to be in the tfios movie for the title to make any sense at all (via demigods-one-in-particular)

YOUR QUOTE IS WRONG

"The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings”

He’s not saying that he is inherently faulted, or that this is not fated to happen, but their fault about any damn thing.  Cassius is saying that they are not fated to be not in charge.  He’s saying that anyone can be in charge, can be in control, can be amazing, but that people are usually scared.  He’s talking about being brave, and taking control of your fate against odds.  That’s what this quote is.  That’s what Shakespeare was talking about. If you are gonna mock the TFIOS movie for not using a quote, at least get the quote and context right, yo. (via thatnerdygamergirl)

this seemed relevant.

Forsooth, thy wrongful words do grieve mine heart!

Shakespeare, absolutely.

Misquotes are evil. Kill them with fire. Inspired by hardforthebard.

(via shakesankle)

oh dear. oh dear, dear me. 

wikiquote lists this as an unsourced quotation of pablo picasso. goodreads cites it to him as well, along with like 7 million other greeting cards that appear in google images when you search this phrase. who knows if anyone ever really said this, but seriously, people, when scrapbooking (or… whatever this is), google is your friend. motto of life: google is your friend.

(thanks for the submission, carrington!)

oh dear. oh dear, dear me.

wikiquote lists this as an unsourced quotation of pablo picasso. goodreads cites it to him as well, along with like 7 million other greeting cards that appear in google images when you search this phrase. who knows if anyone ever really said this, but seriously, people, when scrapbooking (or… whatever this is), google is your friend. motto of life: google is your friend.

(thanks for the submission, carrington!)

podsock asked
What can be done about an Australian greeting card company which periodically produces cards with lines falsely attributed to Shakespeare? I've contacted the person responsible to make her aware of her erroneous attributions, but she's shown no inclination to remove or alter the offending quotes - and boy, are they shockers! The bard would be turning in his grave. When I posted my comments to this effect on her Facebook page, she simply hid the comments. These cards are distributed nationally.

Oooo… do you have a link?

Anonymous asked
Do you have a citation (publication, date, page number) for this verse? "The earth has its music for those who will listen,Its bright variations forever abound;With all the wonders that God has bequeathed us,There is nothing that thrills like the magic of sound.” I don't think it is George Santayana. Observe its absence from _The Complete Poems of George Santayana_ edited by William Holzberger (Bucknell U. P., 1979).

well, no, off the top of my head i don’t, and it certainly seems you know more about george santayana’s works than me, but i can tell you for certain that it isn’t shakespeare.